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Banksy-inspired prints confront climate issues
Culture

Banksy-inspired prints confront climate issues

by Gabrielle Antar 2 min. 04.02.2022
'Politics should not be the only place to make political statements, art can also be political'
The only colourful creation in the room represents the questioning of our existence and role on this planet
The only colourful creation in the room represents the questioning of our existence and role on this planet
Photo credit: Gabrielle Antar

Standing at the back of a hipster café in Esch-sur-Alzette are a dozen black and white prints, inspired by anonymous artist Banksy, which take a stab at advocating for climate justice and look at whether humanity can work in unity.

Artist Jana Kaulmann’s work is based on contemporary issues and the creations at the exhibition are divided into two different themes, Kaulmann said over the phone in the midst of her Covid quarantine.

On the right-hand side of the room, the industrial and dark prints are tackling the alienation that comes with advocating for climate justice. In a world where we are increasingly seeing the effects of a climate emergency, we need to be aware and speak up, Kaulmann said.

Gabrielle Antar

Her activism was partially triggered by the fact that some people labelled artists as having an unessential job during the pandemic, Kaulmann said. The common misconception that artists have nothing to contribute to society is exactly what Kaulmann said she was fighting against. She says art has always been a medium to put the status quo into question and challenge the injustices in society.

The print-like style that Kaulmann uses is inspired by the infamous anonymous artist, Banksy, mainly due to the simplicity of his pieces and the strong political messages behind them. Kaulmann wants to criticise the use of art as a marketing tool rather than a tool for social change.

“Politics should not be the only place to make political statements, art can also be political,” she said.

Gabrielle Antar

On pieces on the left-hand side of the room depict a more general question that goes further than just advocating against the climate emergency – it focuses on the question of whether humanity can work in unity.

Here, she is giving herself more freedom to experiment, incorporating colours into one painting – the only colourful creation in the room. This work represents the questioning of our existence and role on this planet. The use of colour was a tool to “express everything” she couldn’t with the contrasts of black and white, Kaulmann explained.

“Because I focused more on the climate crisis in the beginning, I wanted to go more in depth and ask myself more questions. How is the climate crisis related to racism or feminism? And how are all these different forms of oppression interconnected?” she said. 

The exhibition, called Work in Progress, will be at the Escher Kafé until 27 February.


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