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Child, adult and travel vaccinations
Health

Child, adult and travel vaccinations

by Sarita RAO 3 min. 13.04.2021
What are the recommended childhood vaccinations in Luxembourg and where can you get travel vaccinations?
Yellow Fever vaccinations are given at the travel clinic of the Central Hospital
Yellow Fever vaccinations are given at the travel clinic of the Central Hospital
Photo credit: Shutterstock

We may all be waiting for one specific vaccine, but there are a number of vaccinations for children and adults that are recommended in Luxembourg and paid for by the state.

Despite debates over vaccinations and their contents or side effects, The World Health Organisation states that vaccines prevent some 2-3 million deaths a year. Today, there are vaccines to prevent more than 20 life-threatening diseases like diphtheria, tetanus, influenza and measles. 

In Luxembourg vaccinations are not compulsory, but recommended, and the ones listed below (not travel vaccines) are paid for by the state or reimbursable via the CNS.

Child vaccinations

Vaccinations for children start at 2 months and finish at ages 15-16 years
Vaccinations for children start at 2 months and finish at ages 15-16 years
AFP

Children born in Luxembourg will be given a vaccination book, which will list the dates and types of vaccination a child has received and helps parents to keep abreast of dates for future vaccinations. Below are the child vaccines recommended in Luxembourg:

Note that different timings apply to premature babies.

At 2 months

  • 1st dose of the combined vaccine for diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, meningitis, polio and hepatitis B
  • 1st dose of vaccine for rotavirus gastroenteritis
  • 1st dose of vaccine against pneumococcal infections

At 3 months

  • 2nd dose of the combined vaccine
  • 2nd dose of the rotavirus vaccine

At 4 months

  • 3rd dose of the combined vaccine
  • 3rd dose of the rotavirus vaccine
  • 2nd dose of the pneumococci vaccine

 At 12 months

  • 1st dose of the MMRV vaccine (measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox)
  • 3rd dose of the pneumococci vaccine

At 13 months

4th dose of the combined vaccine

15-23 months

2nd dose of the MMRV vaccine

5-6 years, 12 years

Children have the opportunity to have a catch dose of the combined vaccine if they missed an injection at age 5-6 years and the chance to take a Hep B vaccine at age 12 years if this was not taken earlier.

9-13 years

Vaccine against papillomavirus infections

11-13 years

Bivalent vaccine for girls (reimbursable by the CNS)

15-16 years

A reminder for the Men C and combined vaccine.

Adults vaccinations

Adults can take a combined vaccine booster every 10 years. Those aged 65  years and over can get vaccinations for pneumococci and seasonal influenza. Pregnant women, people with chronic heart conditions, lung, kidney, or auto-immune diseases, will receive a prescription for a seasonal flu vaccine.

Travel vaccinations

Travel to exotic locations may seem like a pipe dream these days, but when overseas travel ramps up again, you may need additional vaccinations depending on the destination. 

It’s advised that you visit your doctor or medical practice at least 6 weeks before your planned travel date to ensure there is plenty of time to order vaccines and medication and provide injections at least 10  days before you travel.

Yellow fever is currently the only disease which requires an international vaccination certificate to prove you have been vaccinated when you enter a country, particularly those in Latin America and Africa. This certificate is valid for life. Travel vaccinations are recommended for any person from the age of 9 months with some exceptions (pregnant women, those with low immune defence or those allergic to eggs since the vaccine contains a small amount of egg protein).

You can get vaccinated for yellow fever at the travel clinic at the Central Hospital of Luxembourg, which can also vaccinate you against rabies, Japanese encephalitis, and hepatitis A and B. Doctors surgeries and medical centres can provide a prescription for anti-malarial drugs.

You can find a full list of travel vaccination requirements from WHO, here.


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From a positive pregnancy test to your baby’s first vaccination. Here’s a guide to having a baby in the Grand Duchy.
Most babies are born in hospital maternity units but you can choose a home birth or birthing centre. Photo: Shutterstock