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30% of births in Luxembourg via C-section
Luxembourg

30% of births in Luxembourg via C-section

31.05.2013 From our online archive
Some 30 percent of babies in Luxembourg were delivered via a Caesarean, or C-, section in 2010, with a high number of elective C-sections, a study has found.

(CS) Some 30 percent of babies in Luxembourg were delivered via a Caesarean, or C-, section in 2010, with a high number of elective C-sections, a study has found.

The Peristat report into perinatal health found that 17.9 percent of births in Luxembourg were by elective C-section, landing the Grand Duchy third in Europe, behind Cyprus (38.8 percent) and Italy (24.9 percent).

On the whole, some 30 percent of babies in the Grand Duchy were delivered in via C-section in 2010. This appears to be a more or less average rate in the EU, even though differences in the number of C-sections are substantial. For example, in Cyprus more than one in two babies are born via Caesarean, while the rate was below one in five in the Netherlands.

The report also found that there has been a rise in the number of obstetric interventions, such as vacuum extraction, with interventions in 10.2 percent of births in Luxembourg.

More twin births and few teenage mothers

Meanwhile, the number of twin births in Luxembourg jumped from 15 per 1,000 in 2004 to around 20 per 1,000 in 2010.

Luxembourg had one of the lowest rates of births with mothers aged 20 or under, with the majority of mothers aged 25 to 34. The Grand Duchy was, however, also among the top 10 countries with the highest percentages of mother aged 35 and over.

Maternal mortality meanwhile was at 9.9 per 100,000 live births between 2006 and 2010, significantly above the ratio in neighbouring countries Germany (3.9) and France (8.4), as well as the Netherlands (4.9).

Fetal mortality of babies born after week 28 was at 2.9 per 1,000, among the lowest in Europe. However, overall fetal mortality was at 9.9 per 1,000 births, pointing towards a higher mortality rate among premature babies.

For the full report visit europeristat.com