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A new level of sophistication for Moore
Culture & Life

A new level of sophistication for Moore

1 2 min. 29.02.2016 From our online archive
In his newest documentary, Moore plays the role of "invader" and visits several countries, mainly in Europe, to discover which ideas good ol' Uncle Sam could use to improve its own prospects.

(NG) "Where to Invade Next": on one hand it's pure Michael Moore, on the other hand the documentary filmmaker may have just reached a new level of sophistication.

In his newest documentary, Moore plays the role of "invader" and visits several countries, mainly in Europe, to discover which ideas good ol' Uncle Sam could use to improve its own prospects. 

The adventures lead him to places like Italy, where employees get excellent benefits, (including an amount of holiday time that is unheard of to Americans); France, where students are served four-course meals in school; and Iceland, where women truly help run the country (and its banks).

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There are moments that are laugh-out-loud funny. Take, for example, Moore planting the star-spangled banner in living rooms and warehouse floors, or his speaking French to students, which comes across as awkward, self-effacing...and hilariously atrocious.

Of course, there is the general George W. Bush bashing--would it be Moore otherwise?--as well as a certain dose of an American over-idealising Europe.

Nevertheless, this time there seems to be a bit more softness from Moore than in his other films ("Fahrenheit 9/11" or "Bowling for Columbine", for example)--perhaps because he is focused more on solutions this time, less on problems.

But the crux of the film is taking a deep look at the US as it stands today, questioning if it is the country Americans really want.

Fearless Moore shows tough images juxtaposed with speeches by leaders "protecting" the country: there are scenes of police brutality, particularly toward black Americans; images of a little girl getting patted down at a security check.

In some cases, Moore seems to stray off topic--but it is exactly those moments which are the most poignant in the film. When visiting Bavaria, for example, he admires the country for posting signs dealing with its troubled Nazi past and questions what America's signs would look like if it did the same. Would they deal with slavery? Taking over of Native American lands? The war in Vietnam?

Moore holds a mirror up to his home country, which will likely hit a nerve with his compatriots. And joining him on his "invasion", whatever your nationality, is well worth it.

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