Change Edition

A slice of Britain at the Anglican Church Fair
Community

A slice of Britain at the Anglican Church Fair

2 min. 15.06.2014 From our online archive
The Anglican Church Fair gave Luxembourg a real taste of Britain on Sunday. The fair, held in Useldange, was a display of talents, competitions and a whole lot of fun.

by Heledd Pritchard

The Anglican Church Fair gave Luxembourg a real taste of Britain on Sunday. The fair, held in Useldange, was a display of talents, competitions and a whole lot of fun.

Surrounded by stalls selling everything from books to specially imported haggis and Irn Bru, it also hosted an international stand for the first time this year. Food stalls included mouthwatering Indian dishes, BBQ and pancakes.

The first competition of the day was cake baking. The eight entered cakes were carefully judged by judges Thierry Lee and Duncan Smith, who marked each cake on presentation, taste and originality.

“The overall standard of the cake competition this year was extremely high,” said Duncan Smith. The winning prize of dinner for two at the Sofitel went to Farrah Gillani for her impressive carrot cake. “We chose the winning cake as it was well balanced, moist and not too sweet,” added Thierry Lee. “It was obvious a lot of work had gone into the preparation and the decoration was all homemade. A very well-deserved winner!”

Back at centre stage was a man who was able to make the impossible seem like, well, a piece of cake. Holder of 23 Guinness Book World Records in feats of strength, Georges Christen, gave a performance that left everyone stunned. Bending three solid nails, tearing a phone directory in four, rolling a frying pan and blowing up a rubber hot water bottle until it exploded didn't fail to impress the audience.

“The most crazy thing I've ever done is probably when I prevented three 110hp Cessna airplanes from taking off. Two of them were attached by a rope to each arm and the third to my teeth,” explained Christen. “I also pulled a 20 tonne railway wagon along 200 metres once.”

Medieval tunes & dog show

After some time of exploring the entertainment on offer, including a snail race, bouncing castle, trailer ride, coconut smashing and football shooting, the air filled with the unfamiliar sounds of medieval music by Musica Canora, a group of musicians from the Czech Republic.

The sound of recorders and shawms were then replaced by a recording of 'who let the dogs out', indicating the start of the all-important dog show. Nine well-groomed dogs of various breeds and sizes paraded around the ring while the three judges took notes.

In third place was Gawane, a creole shepherd, who was rescued from becoming shark bait in her native Guadeloupe by owner Anna Fox. “A lot of these dogs were moved to mainland France where they're most likely to be adopted,” she explained. Daughter Maud, 13, proudly showed the happy dog to the judges. “It's Gawane's first competition and she did really well,” she said.

Second place went to highland dog, Hannah, and the 2014 winner was Sausage, a rough collie. She was given her name after a previous dog, called Chips, passed away and the owners decided to keep tradition going.

“Sausage, the rough collie, had great poise, was such an obedient dog, held herself very well and demonstrated excellent behaviour and grooming,” said one of the judges, Marisa Lintner.

A day full of fun, games and laughter, and the sun in the sky was nothing less than the cherry on the cake.