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ACTA: Nothing will change for Luxembourg
Luxembourg

ACTA: Nothing will change for Luxembourg

14.03.2012 From our online archive
The ACTA treaty, aiming to combat trafficking in counterfeit goods and infringement of intellectual property rights, including the internet, was signed by 31 states, including Luxembourg.

(ADW) - The ACTA treaty, aiming to combat trafficking in counterfeit goods and infringement of intellectual property rights, including the internet, was signed by 31 states, including Luxembourg.

However it will only become legally binding after approval in the Chamber of Deputies. The treaty must also be approved by the European Parliament after signing by the Council of Ministers and the Member States.

Following protests in Luxembourg against the Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, particularly in the capital, Luxembourg's government pointed out that the legislation does not go beyond the existing legal boundaries of the European Union.

"It is true that optional parts of ACTA contain a number of measures against counterfeiting which do not currently exist in Luxembourg legislation," the government said in a statement.

"But the government will not change the current national legislation. With particular regard to illegal downloading, the government will not adopt repressive measures like HADOPI (French internet legislation), Three Strikes, or SOPA / PIPA (US proposed legislations), that go beyond the laws already in force. "

What ACTA does and does not imply

The objective of ACTA is to define common rules and procedures in the fight against counterfeit trafficking networks. ACTA also reflects the growing importance the internet plays in the violation of intellectual property rights, whether it be electronic commerce, counterfeit goods or unauthorised downloading.

The content of the treaty does not go beyond legislation currently in force in the European Union. However, it contains a number of optional measures that states may choose to apply or ignore without prejudice to national legislation.

ACTA treaty opponents accuse it of restricting individual liberties by monitoring internet traffic and even filtering it. These fears appear to be based on proposals made during agreement negotiations, but which were not selected as mandatory.