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Coffee morning stirs up support for cancer charity
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Coffee morning stirs up support for cancer charity

2 min. 27.09.2013 From our online archive
British Ladies Club members started their Friday with a good deed when they gathered for the World's Biggest Coffee Morning, raising money for Macmillan Cancer Support.

(MSS) British Ladies Club members started their Friday with a good deed when they gathered for the World's Biggest Coffee Morning, raising money for Macmillan Cancer Support.

Most people need little time to think, when asked, if they know someone who has cancer. And for most people, the answer comes fast too – yes.

And this was one reason why the British Ladies Club of Luxembourg met at the British Embassy residence to drink coffee, eat cake and raise money for the World's Biggest Coffee Morning, a fundraising event initiated by one of the UK's biggest cancer organisations - Macmillan Cancer Support.

Macmillan encourages people to raise money by arranging coffee mornings or taking part in one, making the charity not only a good excuse to spend some time with friends and family, but also a way to help people battling cancer.

“Everybody is touched by cancer in some way, you've either got a friend or a family member who's affected. (And also, in Luxembourg we have a little bit of extra money) so if you're going to donate money, I think a cancer charity is a very good one to give to,” said participant Debbie Susutoglu.

Having personally struggled with a tumour years ago, Macmillan helped Susutoglu to get a better understanding of the surgery she had to have, as she felt that Luxembourgish hospitals did not provide her with sufficient information.

Macmillan's aim is to give people diagnosed with cancer and their families the strength and energy to fight cancer and get through it.

And with statistics showing that one in three people will get cancer in their lives, the organisation needs all the help it can to keep up their work, which for example includes funding home visits from cancer nurses.

“It's a cause that is very close to people's hearts, as a lot of people in Britain will have used the services of Macmillan or need it in the future. It's one of those things, where you never know if you or someone you know will need it,” said Becky Gollackner, who had organised the event together with Philippa Wilson. Both were very happy have the support of the British ambassador.

“With the kind support of the British ambassador we've been able to use this fantastic location for a very worthwhile cause. I just think we've been very lucky to have support in that way,” said Wilson.