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CSV threatens legal action against Claude Meisch
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CSV threatens legal action against Claude Meisch

2 min. 31.03.2015 From our online archive
CSV MPs Martine Hansen and Félix Eischen are considering legal action against Education Minister Claude Meisch after the latter apparently implied they were somehow involved in leaking exam questions to parents and pupils.

(CS/ks/mig) CSV MPs Martine Hansen and Félix Eischen are considering legal action against Education Minister Claude Meisch after the latter apparently implied they were somehow involved in leaking exam questions to parents and pupils.

In what has been dubbed the “School-Leaks” affair questions for the final year of primary school exams were widely distributed to parents and students. The results of these tests play an important role in student assessment for the “technique” or “classique” branch of secondary school.

Disciplinary proceedings have been launched against two teachers, who could face further legal action.

However, Education Minister Claude Meisch could also soon find himself on the receiving end of legal proceedings should he refuse to apologise to CSV MPs Martine Hansen and Félix Eischen.

Meisch had implied that the MPs were somehow involved in the affair, saying after last week's government council that they had asked a parliamentary question on the issue before it became widely known, as well as making certain statements in parliament that suggested they knew more about the incident.

In an interview with “Le Quotidien” Meisch reiterated that he believes the CSV had been told about the incident by the perpetrators or were possibly even complicit.

'We did not stage a scandal'

Hansen and Eischen refuted the allegations. “We cannot accept being presented as accomplices and brought into connection with criminal activity,” Hansen said at a press conference on Monday in the presence of CSV lawyer Georges Pierret. “We did not stage a scandal, we did not set anybody up, we asked a question. No more and no less.”

The MPs threatened legal action against Meisch should he fail to apologise.

They also outlined how they had become aware of the incident. According to Hansen and Eischen they first heard about tests being sent out early to teachers on March 16. The following day they found out that the tests had been sent to several schools already, ahead of the regular date, prompting a parliamentary question into the risk of abuse.

However, the MPs said that at this point they had no idea about any leaks, finding out about the issue in the press. Following the discovery they sent an urgent parliamentary question on March 19.

Meisch already knew about the leaked exam questions on March 16 and should have reacted immediately, Hansen said. However, he did not do so until the press made the matter public, she criticised.

The CSV deputies see the attack against them as an attempt to hide mistakes made by the ministry.

These mistakes include sending out test papers early but also unlocking a website for primary school teachers with the test answers head of time.