Change Edition

Chat with Belgian band BRNS at Rock-A-Field
Culture & Life

Chat with Belgian band BRNS at Rock-A-Field

1 3 min. 05.07.2015 From our online archive
Belgian band BRNS (pronounced Brains) took to the Rock-A-Field Startin’ Stage on Sunday and in front of a large and enthusiastic crowd. Diego Leyder from the band took some time to chat to Sam Steen.

Belgian band BRNS (pronounced Brains) took to the Rock-A-Field Startin’ Stage on Sunday and in front of a large and enthusiastic crowd played a set that was as dark and brooding as often as it was rousing and storming. Diego Leyder from the band took some time to chat to Sam Steen.

Sam: How do you find the festival circuit? I guess it must be quite different to the club scene?Diego: It’s funny because our music is not really intended to be played in the sunlight and in open air spaces, it’s funny and it’s a challenge to play for people who don’t come (just) to see us play, but we have to win them and play a really good gig so they can enjoy it too and that’s a really nice challenge for us

With the shorter set time you have at festivals you must find yourself playing a kind of “best of” set though right?That’s true, maybe you focus more on the upbeat songs at a festival especially when you have a short gig time. But the thing is we’ve been playing the songs from the first EP a lot because we toured a lot even if it was just an EP and then we released Patine but we played the songs from Patine even before we realised the album. So right now we’re playing songs from Patine that we didn’t play before because they were complicated to play live.

There’s a lot going on with your music though, do you have to change things to translate it from the studio sound to the live concert?Sometimes it’s a bit more rough when we play it live, sometimes there are two or three synths or guitars and we can’t do that because we don’t want to work with computers or play-back. We play everything live except for loops that I do but I play them live. Apart from that we have to choose which part we play and we just choose the most efficient one.

For Patine it wasn’t difficult, for most of the songs, to play them live because we tried to not put too many layers on in the studio. It was more difficult for the first EP because we put a lot of synth layers on and we had to adapt the songs.

360 videos are not supported here. Switch to the Youtube app to watch the video.

So how have you changed from the EP to the album?We wanted to do things that were more direct. We tended to do things that were too baroque or too overgrown so we decided not to put too many layers and just focus on the essence of the songs.

And finally was there any pressure on you, given the success of the EP to produce something as popular with the full length album?We make music because we want to play and write songs that we love and we were really happy with the songs and with the album and that’s what really mattered to us. We knew we didn’t have a song like Mexico or something like that to be radio material or to be really accessible. 

We knew we didn’t have that so we knew we would lose some people but that we would gain some others as we had changed a bit between the EP and the album but there wasn’t too much pressure because we were happy with the songs and were just excited for everyone who knows us to hear it.

Find out more about the band at www.brns.lu

This is a (heavily) edited interview, listen to the full version below: