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Leisure activities increase in Luxembourg
Culture & Life

Leisure activities increase in Luxembourg

14.03.2012 From our online archive
While it might be assumed that a rise in time spent in front of a television or computer screen means less time spent on other leisure activities, a recent CEPS/INSTEAD study shows the exact opposite.

(CS) While it might be assumed that a rise in time spent in front of a television or computer screen means less time spent on other leisure activities, a recent CEPS/INSTEAD study shows the exact opposite.

More Luxembourg residents have participated in cultural activities in 2009 than 1999, while screen time increased too.

The study found that an average time of 3 hours and 50 minutes is spent watching television, playing video games or in front of the computer, marking at least 15 minutes more in TV consumption.

The over-65-year-olds clock in the most TV time, while the 16 to 30 year-olds lead the statistic of computer and internet users.

The study was conducted back in 2009 and does not include information on mobile devices such as smart phones or tablets.

While traditional print media, such as newspapers and magazines saw a decline over the decade starting 1999, books actually enjoyed a much higher readership in 2009.

While 49% said that they had not read a single book in their leisure time in 1999 this number shrunk to 32% in 2009. On the other hand the number of readers with one to six and more books on their yearly reading list has grown.

Additionally, more people are taking part in amateur artistic activities, with numbers climbing from 44% in 1999 to 79% in 2009.

Also more popular are outings to the cinema, concerts, museums, street entertainment and other cultural activities, possibly because more has come on offer in the Grand Duchy over that period of time, for example the opening of the Mudam, the Philharmonie and the refurbishment of the Grand Théâtre.

Some 1,880 individuals aged 15 and over and representative of various educational and professional levels, and personal backgrounds, were consulted for the study.