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Luxembourg banking union warns of increase in phishing attacks
ABBL

Luxembourg banking union warns of increase in phishing attacks

by Yannick LAMBERT 09.08.2021
Hackers attempt to access personal and banking details impersonating companies via emails or phone calls
Some send 'urgent' emails claiming that a Netflix or Amazon Prime subscription has been refused and payment details need updating
Some send 'urgent' emails claiming that a Netflix or Amazon Prime subscription has been refused and payment details need updating
Photo credit: Getty Images

Luxembourg's banking association warns of an increase in recent weeks in phishing via phone calls or emails as attackers attempt to gain access to people's private and banking details.

A typical example is a call from someone claiming to be an employee of Microsoft's support service saying that they have detected a virus on the customer's computer or that a vulnerable version of the software is in use, ABBL said in a press release on Monday. 

They then offer support through remote access and ask for an electronic transfer during which the screen freezes and fraudulent transfers are made.

Some send 'urgent' emails claiming that a Netflix or Amazon Prime subscription has been refused and payment details need updating for instance. If the user ignores these, the phisher continues sending multiple emails, the ABBL said.

If the user updates the information, the screen freezes and the hacker can access credit card details and makes further payments.

ABBL urges users to be vigilant when entering personal details and check whether websites are authentic. The banking union also says that phishing attempts might be more difficult to identify on a phone than on a computer.

Several cybersecurity breaches have been reported in Luxembourg recently. 

The Ketterthill medical laboratories said in July that a leak at French laboratory CERBA had compromised patient data Ketterthil had provided to it between January 2017 and July this year. France’s data protection body, the CNIL, are dealing with the matter, Ketterthill said.    

Names and addresses of at least 24,000 people who had signed petitions were also visible on Luxembourg’s parliament website without their consent following an IT glitch, parliament said last week.

Luxembourg's data privacy regulator - the CNPD, which claimed world fame last month when it slapped a record fine on US retail giant Amazon - saw an 8% increase in reported data leaks in 2020, rising to 378 over the year.  


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