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Gramegna interested in Eurogroup presidency job
Luxembourg

Gramegna interested in Eurogroup presidency job

10.10.2017 From our online archive
While Dijsselbloem will stay in his role until January, it has been decided that candidates for the job could be nominated two weeks before the December Eurogroup meeting.

Luxembourg Finance Minister Pierre Gramegna said he was interested in succeding Dutch Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem as President of Eurogroup. 

While Dijsselbloem will stay in his role until January, it has been decided that candidates for the job could be nominated two weeks before the Eurogroup meeting in December.

Gramegna said he was "ready" for the job, but that a consensus must be found by all Eurogroup members. 

While he won't be putting himself forward, Gramegna argued that at the end of the day what was the most important is that "Dijsselbloem's successor is a competent finance minister."

But Gramegna might face a major disadvantage given that there is already a Luxembourg national holding a top position at the EU-level: Jean-Claude Juncker, the President of the European Commission.

And timing could also play a negative role in Gramegna's election as Eurogroup President since national elections will take place in Luxembourg in 2018. Given that the role of the Democratic Party (DP) in the next government is yet to be known, there is a risk that Eurogroup might need to elect a new president within a year.

Eurogroup President

Dutch Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem has been heading the Eurogroup since January 2013. 

The Eurogroup president is elected by a simple majority of Eurogroup members for a period of 2.5 years.  

The President is responsible for chairing Eurogroup meetings and draws up the Eurogroup's long-term work programme. He or she also presents the outcomes of Eurogroup discussions to the public and to the ministers of non-euro area EU countries. 

The Chairman also represents the Eurogroup in international settings such as G7 or the International Monetary Forum (IMF) and informs the European Parliament about the priorities of the Eurogroup.

Eurogroup has received criticism over time for holding its meetings behind closed doors and for not being democratically controlled. 

(Wort Staff)