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Luxembourg elections and parliament for dummies
Luxembourg

Luxembourg elections and parliament for dummies

23.10.2013 From our online archive
Many of you have been emailing us, sending Facebook or Twitter messages somewhat confused as to how parties that seemed to lose the election could end up in government.

(ADW) After the results of the Luxembourg elections came through it was then announced that the CSV party could form a coalition with another party to form a government. 

Then everything changed suddenly with a three-party coalition seeming possible without the CSV.

But how is that possible? Many of you have been emailing wort.lu/en, sending Facebook or Twitter messages somewhat confused as to how parties that seemed to lose the election could end up in government.

Actually the Luxembourg system of getting seats in parliament, or "Chambre des Députés" is very simple to understand once you know. It is far easier to get your head around than many other countries, so here goes, Luxembourg parliament for dummies.....

  • Firstly the Chambre des Députés has 60 seats for MPs
  • To get a majority therefore, a winning party alone or coalition together requires at least 31 seats
  • Jean-Claude Juncker's party CSV got the most with 23 seats (a loss of 3) but not enough alone and therefore needed to form a coalition with a party with at least 8 seats
  • DP managed 13 seats (a rise of 4 and biggest gainer in elections) LSAP also achieved 13 seats and the Greens 6 seats. Add them up and you get 32!
  • With 32 seats together, the three parties have a majority and therefore have chosen to work together and oust the CSV putting them in opposition.

There is of course a bit more to it, but basically it is quite simple.