Change Edition

Qualifications matter in Luxembourg
Luxembourg

Qualifications matter in Luxembourg

14.03.2012 From our online archive
A 43-year study of people living in Luxembourg has concluded that good qualifications have a direct impact on whether a person has a successful career.

A 43-year landmark study of people living in Luxembourg has concluded that good qualifications have a direct impact on whether a person has a successful career.

It may come as no secret to some that a good education can affect the quality of an individual's career globally.

But, it was found to be especially true for people in Luxembourg for whom, researchers at the university of Luxembourg said, good qualifications are crucial steps to career success.

The founding was made in the MAGRIP study, a 45-year experiment, recording the progress of some 2,800 people since 1968. It first charted the individuals' results in year 6 of primary school and looked at their professional aspirations.

The same study was repeated in 2008 by Prof. Romain Martin and Martin Brunner of EMACS research unit at the University of Luxembourg in collaboration with research centre CEPS/INSTEAD.

About 750 adults, now mostly in their 50s, who took part in the original study were interviewed again.

Researchers said the most striking findings from the study were the impact of good qualifications on career success, which was more pronounced in Luxembourg than in English-speaking countries where cognitive skills were more beneficial.

The report showed flaws in the national educational system in that many children from lower socio-economic backgrounds could not continue their studies, despite their intellectual potential, because they felt they were not encouraged fairly to perform well in exams.

It showed that girls, in particular, were not able to reap the benefits of their cognitive potential.

The study takes its name from the words grey matter and perdue, meaning lost in French. This was designed to be a nod to the lack of support for young people to achieve their intellectual potential.

It suggested that the existing education system should look more closely at developing childrens' cognitive skills and creating alternative courses for learners who do not achieve qualifications.