Change Edition

Luxembourg's animal welfare associations lack money
Luxembourg

Luxembourg's animal welfare associations lack money

25.10.2016 From our online archive
The new animal welfare law, due to pass through parliament by the end of this year or early 2017, will be mostly welcomed by associations as it is the first time a law recognises that creatures, other than humans, have feelings.

(ADW) The new animal welfare law, due to pass through parliament by the end of this year or early 2017, will be mostly welcomed by associations as it is the first time a law recognises that creatures, other than humans, have feelings.

This has always been a grey area where laws are concerned, and animal rights activists fear that implementing regulations for “feelings” may prove problematic in practical terms.

Despite a change in the law, animal welfare associations have absolutely no power in cases of animal cruelty. They remain totally dependent on the support of the police force and the courts.

High costs

It has also been underlined that animal protection does not come at zero cost. For example in the past year, 1,500 cats in Luxembourg were vaccinated and sterilised nationwide, to keep the feline population under control. Such actions often exceed the financial framework of private associations.

Added to that, many cats end up living permanently in shelters due to owners abandoning them, or being unable to deal with them. For the financing of animal sterilisation, protection organsations are usually dependent on the support of public authorities such as communes.

Schifflange and Differdange communes have been held up as examples of this. Both of them pay a large portion of veterinary costs.

On top of that, Differdange Mayor Roberto Traversini, in charge of the country's third largest commune, checks are regularly carried out to see that pets are correctly registered and chipped.

Not only does animal welfare financial deficit cause major problems for associations, but also the fact that all animal shelters in the country are overcrowded.

The shelter in Gasperich, for example, currently has a waiting period of one month. This trend is also noticeable in smaller establishments such as Schifflange, where 100 cats were delivered last year. Here too there is now a waiting list.

However there is a silver lining for Schifflange as a green light has been issued for a new shelter building to be constructed.

Alderman Paul Weimerskirch stated that work could begin next year and added that animal protection was an important task to be tackled by communities.