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Ministry urges travellers to avoid camels this summer
Luxembourg

Ministry urges travellers to avoid camels this summer

13.07.2015 From our online archive
Luxembourg's Health Ministry has urged travellers to avoid contact with camels this summer, among other things in a raft of recommendations issued in light of recent MERS-Cov cases.

Luxembourg's Health Ministry has urged travellers to avoid contact with camels this summer, among other things in a raft of recommendations issued in light of recent MERS-Cov cases.

Middle East Respiratory Sydnrome caused by a Coronavirus (MERS-Cov) is a virally spread illness the first recorded cases of which were reported in 2012 in Saudi Arabia.

It is an acute respiratory illness which in severe cases can also affect other organs. Since 2012, around 1,400 cases were reported, with the majority in the Middle East, while 600 people have died as a result of contracting it.

MERS-Cov has been reported in seven European countries, in cases which were linked to the Middle East. Around 200 cases were reported in South Korea.

The illness is believed to have been spread by people visiting the Arabian Peninsular where the illness is thought to have come from camels.

The ministry said that the epidemic which began in May 2015 appears to have peaked. Nevertheless the ministry urges caution.

Risk of contagion

In South Korea, it said that the risk of contagion to tourists travelling from Luxembourg is minimal except for travellers who come into contact with health services, above all in affected regions.

Tourists visiting the Arabian Peninsular also face a risk. The ministry said that contact with medical institutions or with camels or camel products could increase the risk.

In all instances, travellers are urged to take precautions by applying strict hygiene practices and avoiding contact with ill people.

Visitors to the Arabian Peninsular should avoid contact with camels, refrain from visiting farms or consuming unpasteurised camel milk and from eating food which is not fully heated through.

Vulnerable travellers are urged to get advice from their doctor before travelling to this area. 

Symptoms

Anyone returning from a region where MERS-Cov cases have been reported and who suffers from symptoms including breathing problems, a cough and high temperature two weeks after coming home, should speak to their doctor immediately.

To speak to someone from the Health Inspectorate regarding MERS-Cov, call 247-85650

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