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Mayor blocks mention of 1980s bombings at exhibition
Museum

Mayor blocks mention of 1980s bombings at exhibition

by Yannick HANSEN 29.06.2021
Lydie Polfer banned parts of the exhibitions because of an ongoing court case, Luxembourg City museum director says
The terrorist attacks happened between 1984 and 1986 and primarily targeted crucial infrastructure
The terrorist attacks happened between 1984 and 1986 and primarily targeted crucial infrastructure
Photo credit: Lé Sibenaler/LW-Archiv

Luxembourg City mayor Lydie Polfer has blocked museum exhibition from dealing with a bombing scandal that shook the country between 1984 and 1986, the director of Luxembourg's City Museum has told the press.

The mayor decided to veto one part of an exhibition about conspiracy theories that was related to the so-called "Bommeleeër" (bombers) scandal because a court case relating to the affair was still ongoing, museum director Guy Thewes told broadcaster 100,7 on Tuesday.

Between 1984 and 1986, unknown perpetrators carried out a series of high-profile bombings and other acts of sabotage at locations across the country, including attacks on power poles at the airport and on the headquarters of Saint-Paul Luxembourg, the publisher of the Luxembourg Times.

The museum - which is funded by the City Council and run by civil servants - had to shelve the exhibition at Polfer's request, putting into doubt its autonomy opposition councillor Tom Krieps was quoted as saying by 100,7.

No-one has ever been convicted in connection with the attacks, which spawned a wide range of conspiracy theories on the possible motives and identities of the perpetrators, with allegations that members of the country's security services or royal family could have been responsible.

The attacks in the 1980s indirectly contributed to the collapse of Jean-Claude Juncker's government in 2013, after a wiretapping controversy related to an investigation into the bombings led the former prime minister to call early elections which ended his 18-year term in office.

A parliamentary inquiry had held Juncker's office responsible for failing to rein in an out-of-control intelligence service (SREL), following allegations that members had recorded a conversation with a source and tapped the source's phone for several days without proper approval.


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