Change Edition

Pirate Party demands clarity about SREL – NSA ties
Luxembourg

Pirate Party demands clarity about SREL – NSA ties

2 min. 02.11.2013 From our online archive
Luxembourg's Pirate Party has demanded clarity about the ties between Luxembourg's secret service and the US National Security Agency after a document was published in Spain, claiming a “focused cooperation” between the two countries.

(CS) Luxembourg's Pirate Party has demanded clarity about the ties between Luxembourg's secret service and the US National Security Agency after a document was published in Spain, claiming a “focused cooperation” between the two countries.

An open letter by the Pirate Party to the government comes in the wake of a classified document, published in Spanish newspaper El Mundo. Headlined “Sharing computer network operations cryptologic information with foreign partners”, Luxembourg is listed as a “Tier B” country, alongside several other EU member states, as well as Turkey, South Korea and Switzerland.

The UK is listed as a “Tier A – Comprehensive Cooperation” country.

Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker had previously denied that the Luxembourg government knew about NSA surveillance programme PRISM and a parliamentary control commission in September confirmed that there had not been any cooperation – or request for cooperation – between the NSA and the SREL about the controversial surveillance programme.

Andy Maar of the Pirate Pirate, however, commented: “It is more than scandalous that every statement by the political and administrative intelligence service chiefs [Jean-Claude] Juncker and [Patrick] Heck in regards to the work of the service is being refuted bit by bit through the work of the press.”

Referring to the document published in Spain he added: “This document does not only show that there was concrete cooperation, but also that it appears to have been closer than that with, for example, France,” which is listed as a “limited cooperation” country.

In light of reports from across Europe that meta-data about EU citizens, such as communication data, was forwarded by local intelligence service to the NSA, the Pirate Party demands to know whether the SREL and the NSA work in collaboration with each other, and if so, since when.

Additionally, the party wants to know whether meta-data about all Luxembourg citizens was passed on to the NSA, or only on demand and in specific cases, and whether the SREL knows if there are any American surveillance stations in the country.

The Pirates also raised the question whether there is a deliberate tactic of “plausible deniability” in operation in the Grand Duchy, which leaves higher authorities in the dark on purpose, so they can deny allegations to the media or enquiry commissions.

“Citizens have a right to know who collected data about then and who is allowed to access this, as movement and communication data are an intimate part of privacy,” Claude Feltgen of the Pirates said.

“We want to know what the government has done since Snowden's revelations to protect the privacy of citizens enshrined in the constitution,” he concluded.