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Royals cast their ballots
Culture & Life

Royals cast their ballots

07.06.2015 From our online archive
The young Luxembourg royals on Sunday headed to the polls, just like the rest of the country's nationals, to cast their ballots in a referendum on foreigner voting rights, the right to vote from 16 and limiting ministerial mandates to 10 years.

(CS) The young Luxembourg royals on Sunday headed to the polls, just like the rest of the country's nationals, to cast their ballots in a referendum on foreigner voting rights, the right to vote from 16 and limiting ministerial mandates to 10 years.

Crown Prince Guillaume and Crown Princess Stéphanie, as well as Prince Louis and Princess Tessy, and Princess Alexandra and Prince Sébastien were spotted making their way to the polling station in Luxembourg City on Sunday morning.

Elegantly dressed, the young royals walked the short distance from the palace, with the sun shining from a bright blue sky.

The referendum marked the second time that Princess Stéphanie voted in Luxembourg after becoming a Luxembourg national upon her marriage with Prince Guillaume in October 2012. She previously took part in the 2013 national elections.

It was also the first time that Prince Sébastien was spotted back in the Grand Duchy following his May graduation from the Franciscan University in Steubenville, Ohio, where he earned a BA in International Business, Marketing and Communications.

Some 245,000 Luxembourgers voted in the first national referendum in 10 years in Luxembourg on Sunday.

Up for a vote were three questions on whether

  • voting rights should be opened to teenagers from the age of 16 on a voluntary basis (voting is mandatory for all eligible Luxembourg nationals resident in the country), 
  • foreigners should be given the right to vote (if they wish to) provided they have lived in the country for 10 years or more and have previously taken part in a local or European election while resident in Luxembourg,
  • politicians should be able to be a member of the cabinet consecutively for a maximum period of 10 years.

The referendum is not legally binding but consultative, with the results to be respected as part of a wider constitutional reform project.