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The garden where almost everything ends up on a plate
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The garden where almost everything ends up on a plate

8 1 29.08.2021 From our online archive
Flowers grown in Luxembourg can be eaten in soups, desserts, salads, on wedding cakes or used in flavoured drinks and oils
Kate Greenwood, owner of Botanika garden in Hobscheid, western Luxembourg
Kate Greenwood, owner of Botanika garden in Hobscheid, western Luxembourg
Photo credit: Sibila Lind

By Sibila Lind

When her two daughters moved away from home to start their studies, Kate Greenwood decided to start from scratch and set up her own project – growing edible flowers.

"I've always loved gardens, I grew up on a farm," said the Englishwoman who has lived in Luxembourg for 27 years. "I've been trying to find a niche in the market because there aren't many people here who grow edible flowers."

In her garden in Hobscheid in western Luxembourg, she grows flowers which can be consumed in soups, desserts, pancakes, sprinkled over a salad, on wedding cakes or used in flavoured drinks and oils.

Walking past a row of sunflowers, she says: “If you turn a sunflower upside down and stick some olive oil on it, you can roast it.”

She also has flowers which can only be used in bouquets, mainly because they are inedible or even poisonous. In her garden called Botanika, there are some Luxembourgish roses, including the Princess Alexandra rose. She is working on a new project to create rose candles. Greenwood also sells dried flowers, herbs, teas and floral confetti.

One of her goals is to allow people to find such products locally.

"About 60% of the produce we buy in supermarkets comes from elsewhere,” she said. “There are flowers that start their journey in Israel, then to Brussels, just to end up on our shelves. Of course, some arrive wilted at the end of the long journey."


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