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Made in Luxembourg – what’s behind the label?
Brand

Made in Luxembourg – what’s behind the label?

by Jenny Biver 4 min. 19.03.2022 From our online archive
Three small businesses explain why they applied for this instantly identifiable crown, and details on how to get the Made in Luxembourg label
"The label legitimises my work and provides a tangible connection to the source," says Verónica Di Leo
"The label legitimises my work and provides a tangible connection to the source," says Verónica Di Leo
Photo credit: Lugdivine Unfer

The easily identifiable crown overarching the words “Made in Luxembourg” is popping up more and more, but what’s behind the visual and what are the prerequisites for applying for it?

Three small businesses which carry the label tell us why they chose to apply and what the added value has been for them.

Made in Luxembourg's crown gives local brands and businesses additional value
Made in Luxembourg's crown gives local brands and businesses additional value
Credit: LT Archives

The Made in Luxembourg label is an initiative by the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, the Chamber of Commerce and the Chamber of Skilled Trades and Crafts. It was established in 1984 and is aimed at identifying the Luxembourgish origin of both products and services. In return, the label allows businesses to promote their Luxembourgish know-how domestically and abroad.

To date, around 1,500 companies have received the label. From agricultural operations, arts and crafts businesses, to grocers, creative agencies, or IT companies – there is hardly a sector that is not represented in the catalogue of companies on the Made in Luxembourg website.

Three businesses with the crown

Verónica Di Leo modelling her design jewellery
Verónica Di Leo modelling her design jewellery
Photo: Lugdivine Unfer

One of them is Artesana Handmade Design, a small design jewellery brand run by Verónica Di Leo. She applied for the logo a little over a year ago and it has provided her with better brand recognition and helped her grow partnerships with local stores that sell limited editions of her collections. 

The trademark assures customers that her artisan pieces are genuinely handcrafted in Luxembourg. “My creations are simple, but simple doesn’t mean easy. There is knowledge, experience, and technique behind each piece, and I spend a lot of time creating my work to transmit the beauty of handmade. The label legitimises my work and provides a tangible connection to the source,” Verónica explains.

Similarly, Lola Valerius says it’s an honour to showcase the label for her artisan chocolate brand as it visually represents her values of locally produced and quality products. “There are still a lot of brands that don’t produce their goods themselves”, she says, adding: “The label allows brands with a local value chain to stand out”. Alongside adding value to her produce, the trademark has also brought her awareness beyond the borders of Luxembourg, allowing her to represent and promote local know-how internationally.

While “Made in Luxembourg” primarily makes you think of products, there are many services that are carried out and provided locally that have earnt the trademark.

Local services can also apply for the label like dress code expert Florence Lemeer-Wintgens
Local services can also apply for the label like dress code expert Florence Lemeer-Wintgens
Photo: Sylvain Munsch

Dress code expert Florence Lemeer-Wintgens, through her company Look@Work, provides coaching services to help people maximise their potential through their image. Although originating from Belgium, Florence has been in Luxembourg since 1987. 

Applying for the label was a natural extension to her business development, she says, “I think it’s important to be a local player and ambassador of Luxembourgish expertise, and carrying the trademark is a way for me to thank Luxembourg for helping me to develop my activities in the country.” She believes the label is especially valuable for small business entrepreneurs, as it is a recognition of being part of the Luxembourgish economy.

Who can apply?

To be able to file an application, individual or commercial companies must be affiliated either to the Chamber of Commerce and carry out commercial activities, or be affiliated to the Chamber of Skilled Trades and Crafts, and carry out craft activities. Businesses that are in the financial or real estate sector as well as non-profit associations are not eligible.

Prerequisites

First and foremost, businesses must be registered and based in Luxembourg for at least one year. The label is granted for goods that are either obtained in Luxembourg, or whose last substantial production process or important manufacturing stage took place in Luxembourg. In the services industry, a provider must have a fixed place of business in Luxembourg - a permanent establishment - and regularly carry out activities in the country. 

How to apply

To file a request, companies must submit an online application with information about the company as well as attach supporting documents, such as photographs, brochures, or a website, that motivate the request and demonstrate the business activity. Lastly, candidates must answer a questionnaire related to the objective of the label for the company as well as the company’s integration into the Luxembourgish economy.

Once the request is submitted, a member of the label’s surveillance council sets up an interview and a possible company visit to check if the application is admissible. If the board does not deem the business applicable for the label, the decision is final and not open to appeal.

Once all steps have been fulfilled and approved, an application fee of €200 has to be paid to the Chamber to which the business belongs. After the approval, the business commits itself to display the logo on authorised products and promotional material (website, brochures, commercial offers etc), and allows its name and information to be published on the website of Made in Luxembourg.


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